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Basset Hound - Purebred
Dogs and Puppies

A member of the Hound group, the foremost use of the Basset Hound in the United States is for the hunting of rabbits. Pack hunting with Bassets as a sport continues on today in both France and England. In temperament these dogs are very mild, never sharp or timid.



They are also one of the most easily recognized of all dog breeds. Be forewarned, Bassets are notoriously difficult to housebreak.

It is very true that Bassets love food. It is also true that they are less physically "energetic" than many breeds.

They do enjoy exercise that gives them the chance to use their own natural endurance: such as on long walks or taking them on hiking trips.


Remember to always keep them on a leash when outdoors unless you are inside a securely fenced area.

The Basset Hound is laid back, sociable, affectionate and a great dog for children and adults of all ages. This breed is considered a "wet mouthed" (they do drool quite a bit) breed. So make sure you have a slobber rag if you want a Basset!

Since Bassets are considered to be "pack" animals they are an excellent pet choice for families with children and other pets already, however they may not do well left if by themselves for long periods of time.

Enjoy the video below of one of these guys in action



It has a deep and musical bark. It is a short-legged dog, heavier in bone, size considered, than any other breed of dog, and while its movement is deliberate, it is in no sense clumsy. Basset Hounds may be short, but they are not small dogs - easily weighing in at 50 to 70 pounds.

Their smooth, short-haired coat is extremely easy to groom. Comb and brush them out with a firm bristle brush, and shampoo these dogs only when needed.

Clean their droopy ears every week and trim their toenails regularly. This breed is a constant shedder but not hard to keep under control with frequent groomings.

These dogs are scent hounds, bred to hunt by scent alone. In trailing ability, the accuracy of his nose makes him second only to the Bloodhound, and when there is nothing better to do, Bassets sleep. Overall they are not destructive when left alone.

Extra care must be taken around swimming pools if you have a Basset Hound. With the majority of their weight in the front of their body and with such short legs, they can swim only very short distances, and with a lot of difficulty. If you have a pool and a Basset, make sure you provide a life preserver for him.

They turn on to food, but not necessarily to exercise. Best home: indoors with their family, but given daily exercise outside - do not prompt the dog to do excessive jumping however, due to his short legs and long back. Daily walks are recommended.

Dr. Jones Ultimate Canine Health Formula - Complete Dog Health Supplement

Country of origin: France, further developed in England
Lifespan: 10-12 years
Colors: Most usually white with brown, rust or tan markings
Known health problems: Bloat, glaucoma, Von Willebrand's Disease, luxating patella, ectropion, obesity, lameness, hip and elbow dysplasia
Famous Bassets: The cartoon character Droopy Dog; The Dukes of Hazzard, Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane's sidekick, Flash; Hush Puppies brand shoes feature a Basset Hound



Return from Basset Hound to Hound Dog Group

I know that dogs are pack animals, but it is difficult to imagine a pack of standard poodles... and if there was such a thing as a pack of standard poodles, where would they rove to? Bloomingdale's? - Yvonne Clifford